3 thoughts on “Reducing surprises with your project and game development

  1. Arnold Hendrick says:

    In game development, the biggest source of “unknown unknowns” is the culture of the industry itself. Game developers are dreamers. They dream of better games. Artists may dream of better animation, more visually striking worlds, or cooler looking objects. Engineers dream of solving new problems in new ways, or using new tools. And let’s not even talk about designers, whose grandiose ideas can be difficult to pin down and estimate, much less implement.

    It takes charisma and discipline to harness all this dreaming to achieve a specific objective – a new game. All cases of project overrun or failure I’ve seen (including some of my own early mistakes) had too much dreaming and not enough hard-nosed, practical project management. Management consciously or subconsciously was too invested in the dream, and became blind to issues of time, money and/or resources.

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  2. Nice article. It seems to me that pretty much everything in this article applies to all software development, not just games. Is there any specific part that you feel applies more to game development in specific?

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    • I tried to make it general but most of my experience is with games and I think it all applies. I would say it is very important to have a clear understanding of scope and avoid unnecessary complexity.

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