Goodbye, Mr. Jobs

Rather than reiterating what has been written elsewhere, I wanted to post my thoughts on Steve Job’s impact. I am far from an Apple-phile, I have always pushed for DOS and Windows over Mac, did not have my first iPod until I was given one about three years ago and thought the iPhone did not have a chance in the crowded mobile market, but I believe Steve Jobs was arguably the most important person of the last ten years.

Not only did he turn around Apple (to put it mildly), but he saved the US tech industry. Unlike the other tech leaders, Apples products caused excitement throughout the country (and arguable the world). Not to diminish the contributions of the Facebooks and Oracles of the world, but what Steve Jobs built at Apple captures the imagination of entrepreneurs and business leaders and individuals throughout the world. This excitement translated into an energy in the Bay area that drove and continues to drive a confidence and dynamism that is created billions of dollars in market cap, thousands of new companies and tens of thousands of jobs. Steve Jobs did not only turnaround Apple, but is largely responsible for one of the few bright spots in the world economy, the robust tech sector.

Hello 519 Games, Thank You Disney

Although I normally use this blog to discuss business issues related to social gaming, I wanted to elaborate on my recent career move and thank all the great people at Disney International that I have worked with the past year.

Today is my first day as the CEO of 519 Games (no, our website it not up yet). 519 is a joint venture of two media companies, the EW Scripps Company (http://www.scripps.com/) and Capitol Broadcasting (http://www.cbc-raleigh.com/). We are currently building a fantastic team and will be one of the top five social gaming companies (both social web and social mobile) by the end of 2012. More details will emerge over the next few weeks.

I also wanted to take this opportunity to thank all of my former colleagues with Disney International. The people I met and worked with in Europe, Russia, India and Latin America were some of the most incredible, smartest and nicest individuals that I have ever worked with. I originally was going to call them out specifically, but every time I wrote a draft of this post I remembered somebody else. I realized that no matter how hard I tried, I would forget someone who improved my experience.

From the top of Disney International down, it is an incredible and diverse group. Everybody was approachable, everybody was nice and friendly and everyone worked together. Yet the diverse personalities were what made the last year so great. Although it is difficult to articulate, I met literally hundreds of people who had larger than life personalities, all unique, all creative and all helpful.

It was this great collection of people that helped me learn and grow professionally that I can now move on to the biggest opportunity I have ever had. Again, thank you all.

User Generated Content and Feedback in Social Games

For a space that is considered the cutting edge of innovation, social game companies are missing two of the biggest trends in the entertainment and online spaces. There are no major social games that allow players to create and share content. And despite Facebook’s efforts, there really is no crowd sourcing or popularity measures that help people find social games.

User Generated Content

Rarely a day goes by without seeing a major user generated content initiative, from Super Bowl commercials created by consumers to the explosive growth of Quora, yet this trend has been virtually non-existent in the social gaming space. Ironically, it is easy to find ways that consumers could create content that would elevate these games. Players are often frustrated at the lack of new content once they have been playing a game for months or even weeks. Why not allow the community to create new content that is then used to keep the game fresh. There are great amateur artists who could create new building or even crops for a Cityville. I am sure there are also players who would love to create hidden object scenes for a game like Gardens of Time. Not only would you get fresh content, you would content that he game team has not even thought of. A game with user generated content would take on a life of its own.

User generated content is an even more attractive option to compliment a social game company’s international strategy. What better way to make a game feel more French than allowing French players to create local content. International versions of many social games reflect the biases and stereotypes of foreign countries often found in the Bay Area, be it sticking a “bag-ett” in a French game or making a Kalashnikov the only local content for a Russian version. Instead, allowing local players to customize the game creates a local game for each market, one that almost certainly will be more viral and monetize better.

Popularity

People are increasingly using different measures of popularity to make their choices, in entertainment, dining, purchasing, pretty much all aspects of life. Millions focus on top-reviewed restaurants on Yelp to pick a dining establishment, Amazon.com’s best seller list to find new books, trending Twitter topics to get their news, etc. As Bloomberg Businessweek pointed out in its 15 August issue, while there is no accounting for taste, the data can be helpful and even inspiring. Yet in social games, players cannot easily follow these trends. Seriously, players are not going to go to AppData to see the latest numbers. And Facebook does a terrible job of showing people what gams are hot, though they have tried a few times. The game companies are no better. If you are a fan of a Wooga game, can you easily find out which is their biggest game, not really.

This is another opportunity that takes on increased importance internationally. While foreign consumers often have different tastes, they usually like to use the performance of a product in one place to help them decide if it could be interesting. A movie that has failed in the US is much less likely to get traction in Poland, regardless of the merits of the film.

Overall, user generated content and better measures of popularity are fantastic opportunities for social game companies that can increase revenue and traffic significantly.